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Houston Metro Area, Katy, Museums, Nonprofits & Charities

Katy Veterans Memorial Museum & VFW Post

Sign outside of the museum and VFW post
Posted: May 24, 2019 at 11:52 pm   /   by   /   comments (6)

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Katy Veterans Memorial Museum ( a non-profit entity) honors all those who have served in all wars in which the U.S. has participated. The Veterans of Foreign Wars Katy Post 9182 holds meetings in the sizable room to the back of the museum.

The address of the Katy Veterans Memorial Museum and the VFW Post is 6206 George Bush Drive, Katy, Texas 77493.

Exterior of Katy Veterans Memorial Museum

Exterior of Katy Veterans Memorial Museum

Before entering the museum, there is a grand old oak tree in the front with a dedication plaque.

Liberty Tree

Liberty Tree

Liberty Tree Dedication

Liberty Tree Dedication

Floyd E. Breedlove

The Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9182 bears the name Floyd E. Breedlove (born 01-13-1917, KIA 03-18-1944). “Lieutenant Breedlove was lost in combat while piloting a B-17 in the early days of World War II on a return from a bombing mission over Augsburg, Germany. Floyd was a 1934 graduate of Katy High School.”

Lt. Floyd E. Breedlove's combat mission notes

Lt. Floyd E. Breedlove’s combat mission notes

The Price of Freedom

Immediately upon entering the building is a hallway with rooms branching off of it. In the hall, is a large board with names of the deceased. People honor their loved ones, or in the case of former President George H.W. Bush, he acknowledged his shipmate who was killed in action.

It is a reminder to everyone that the price of freedom is never free.

In Memoriam plaques inside of the museum

In Memoriam plaques inside of the museum

President Bush honored his former shipmate

President Bush honored his former shipmate

General Patton Room

Named the General Patton Room, this is the first door on the right. In the General Patton room are displays of every conflict that our nation has been engaged, starting with the Revolutionary War going forward to the present day.

Visitors can also research by reading books, and even watching tapes and movies in this room.

War information and displays inside the General Patton Room of the museum

War information and displays inside the General Patton Room of the museum

Displays inside the General Patton Room of the museum

Exhibits inside the General Patton Room of the museum

Korea displays

Korea displays

Vietnam and Cold War displays

Vietnam and Cold War displays

War on Terror displays

War on Terror displays

So many fascinating details are on display, and by spending some time in this room of the Katy Veterans Memorial Museum, much can be learned. Were you aware that decks of playing cards served a war purpose? See the photo below.

Decks of Playing Cards

Decks of Playing Cards

Legacy Room

Across the hall from the General Patton Room is the Legacy Room. Every branch of the service is represented in this room along with many artifacts, uniforms, medals, different types of weaponry, and other examples of what was utilized during wartime and peacekeeping missions.

Many photos also tell a visual story. Information printed alongside the pictures and artifacts is instructional. The images below show only a portion of what is on display in this room, and the same could be said for what is displayed above in the General Patton room. Interested parties could spend much time in both places, reading and learning about our military and history.

U.S. Coast Guard Displays

U.S. Coast Guard Displays

POW - MIA Display

POW-MIA Display

Women in Service Display

Women in Service Display

Spoils of War on display

Spoils of War on display

Portion of U.S. Army Display

A portion of U.S. Army Display

U.S. Navy Displays

U.S. Navy Displays

Mae West Life Preserver Information

Attached to the Mae West life preserver was a card with the following information typed upon it.

“The Mae West was a common nickname for the first life preserver, which was invented in 1928 by Peter Markus with his subsequent improvements in 1930 and 1931.

The nickname was originated because someone wearing the inflated life preserver often appeared to be as physically endowed as the actress Mae West as well as rhyming slang for breast. It was popular during World War II with U.S. Army Air Forces and Royal Air Forces servicemen, who were issued inflatable Mae Wests as part of their flight gear. This Mae West is similar to the one former President George Bush wore when he was shot down in the north Pacific during World War II.”

Photos of President George H.W. Bush plus a Mae West Life Preserver

Photos of President George H.W. Bush plus a Mae West Life Preserver

The Devil’s Brigade

Typed information in front of a uniform is the following regarding The Devil’s Brigade:

“Properly designated as the 1st Special Services Force, the Devil’s brigade was a joint World War II American-Canadian commando unit trained at Fort Harrison near Helena, Montana, in the United States. Many modern American and Canadian Special Forces units such as the Green Berets, Delta Force, the Navy SEALS, and the Canadian highly secretive JTF2, trace their heritage to this unit.

Officially activated in July 1942 under the command of Lt. Col. Robert T. Frederick, volunteers for this 1800 man unit consisted primarily of enlisted men with experience as lumberjacks, forest rangers, hunters, game wardens and the like. They were given rigorous and intensive training in stealth tactics, hand-to-hand combat, the use of explosives for demolition, parachuting, amphibious warfare, rock climbing, mountain warfare, and ski troops.

It was at Anzio in 1944 that the Germans dubbed the 1st Special Service Force the “Devil’s Brigade.” A passage in a dead German soldier’s diary referred to them as “black devils,” referring to the black boot polish the members smeared on their faces for covert operations at night. Their campaigns took them through Italy, Southern France, and the Rhinelands.”

The Devil's Brigade

The Devil’s Brigade

Medal of Honor

Were you aware that there are three distinct medals of honor? Pictured below on the left is the one awarded to U.S. Army personnel who deserve it. In the middle is the one assigned to the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard recipients. On the right is the one given to U.S. Air Force combatants.

Medals of Honor Display

Medals of Honor Display

Much To Discover!

In the museum are models of airplanes such as the Boeing B-17, called the FLYING FORTRESS; the Boeing B-52, called the STRATOFORTRESS and the North American B-25, called the MITCHELL, among others along with printed information about each airplane.

Pictures of battleships, artifacts such as an old WWII field telephone and Morse Code equipment are just some of what is to be discovered in the Katy Veterans Memorial Museum.

VFW Meeting Room

The cavernous meeting room to the back of the museum accommodates VFW meetings and affairs. Members are always welcomed to join.

Photo of the large VFW meeting room to the back of the museum

Photo of the large VFW meeting room to the back of the museum

48 Star U.S. Flag

48 Star U.S. Flag

A bronze plaque over the framed 48 Star Flag indicates that it was first flown over the dedication of the Floyd E. Breedlove Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9138 in 1947.

If you wish to visit this fantastic Katy Veterans Memorial Museum, be aware that the hours of operation are Monday – Friday from 9 AM to 4 PM, plus the first Saturday of each month from 9 AM to 2 PM. Admission is free! Call this number, 281-291-8387, to arrange group tours at other times.

Comments (6)

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  • June 3, 2019 at 2:20 pm Bruce

    So interesting to visit. A well done museum in a small Texas city.

    Reply
    • June 3, 2019 at 3:45 pm Peggy

      Hi Bruce,

      You are so correct. While the Katy Veterans Memorial Museum may not be the largest of its type, it is well worth a visit. The price is certainly right. It is free admission!

      Reply
  • May 29, 2019 at 8:12 pm Virginia Billeaud Anderson

    Thank you Peggy. Very fine job. Virginia

    Reply
    • May 29, 2019 at 8:23 pm Peggy

      Hi Virginia,

      The Katy Veterans Memorial Museum is worth a visit. There is much more to read and learn about the different wars as well as our service members. Allowing 1 1/2 hours would be my recommendation. So glad you enjoyed reading this.

      Reply
  • May 29, 2019 at 4:14 pm Christy B

    Excellent post, well timed with Memorial Day. There is so much to stop and be thankful for.

    Reply
    • May 29, 2019 at 4:45 pm Peggy

      Hi Christy,

      The timing turned out well as to when this post was published, but as you wrote, we should stop and be thankful each and every day for what our men and women in the military do for us on a continual basis.

      Reply